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Tool chests can provide perfect gadget porn – lots of beautifully crafted objects that fit intricately into a perfect container.Here are some of our favorites, including the stunning chest which resides in the Smithsonian and belonged to Organ and Piano maker, Henry O Studley at the other end of the scale is the garden variety, utilitarian tool box that saved the NASA Spacelab .

top 10 interesting tool chests

Many of today’s most notable collections, such as the British Museum started off as wunderkammer, or cabinets of curiosities. These started in the 16th century are were somewhere between Ripley’s Believe it or Not and the Smithsonian, eclectic collections of man-made and natural objects of wonder. These were either rooms or spectacular intricate cabinets.Today there are deliberate attempts to re-create the very particular feel of these collections, such as at the museum of Jurassic Technology in L.A, which combines the real and fake or the British Museum’s Enlightenment Gallery.

the wunderkammer through history

Flight simulation is quintessentially high tech, the inspiration for Virtual Reality, so I went looking for early examples and found some delightfully quixotic alternatives to modern day immersive environments. These include the wooden mockups of the Apollo capsules, the stunted Link simulator, used during WWII, which looks like a kids ride outside a supermarket and the very early pre-WWI training rig for the Antoinette aircraft, which principally consists of two half barrels on top of each other. But the best of all are the incredible Convair trainer which has an extra cockpit attached to its front and the celestial navigation trainers which are masterpieces of pre-electronic navigational complexity.

12 Retro Flight Simulators

There were justifiable fears of being buried alive, before modern medicine could safely identify the difference between certain types of paralysis or coma and being dead. Fears which were exacerbated by fiction such as The Premature Burial by Edgar Allan Poe. As a result a bizarre range of contraptions were invented to signal having been buried alive, from bells, whistles and even a spring loaded ejector coffin which might actually kill other people from the shock of seeing an interred body spring out of the ground in a cemetery.Added to this were ranges of hermetically sealed iron coffins and a device to prevent grave robbing consisting of a booby-trap subterranean torpedo.For more of these, check out: http://deathreferencedesk.org/2010/02/02/premature-burial-device-patents/

12 Safety Coffins

One of the benefits of the tradition of wooden buildings in the US is that they have fairly good tensile strength, so you can pick them up and move them elsewhere without them falling apart. This makes for some fairly surreal imagery, particularly in time lapse, since homes are all about static permanency. And we’ve included one daring masonry building move in the list, just to prove it can be done.

8 moving houses videos

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WTF Is That. No 1.

March 30th, 2009 #link

WTF is that is a new regular feature on Oobject. We’ll trawl the web looking for unusual or interesting gadgets or technology and readers have to guess what they are from the picture.

Today’s item looks somewhat Persian or Sci-fi esque, an odd combination of chain-mail and bronze that is difficult to put in place or time.

What is it? Answers in the comments. Points for the correct or most witty answer.



6 Responses to “WTF Is That. No 1.”

  1. LV Says:

    It’s a Japanese Samurai mask.

  2. wondo Says:

    it`s a ww1 mask for tank personell

  3. admin Says:

    Damn Wondo, that was impressively quick. Yes its a WWI ‘anti-splatter’ mask worn by tank drivers.

    I’ll put up another one in a sec.

  4. Karstov Says:

    It`s an E.T./Kanye West mask.

  5. Shawn Says:

    It’s what Michael Jackson wears off camera.

  6. igel Says:

    It´s the ancient Anti-Influenza flu mask…..