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Diving bells were originally just that – an upturned church bell with enough trapped air to stand in while reclaiming things from shipwrecks in relatively shallow water. As such the engraving of Edmund Halley’s 18th century diving bell is one of my favorite images on oobject, because it shows gadgetry from an age prior to machines. There’s a guy walking around the sea floor in what looks more like a velvet courtier’s outfit that a divers suit. This list is a collection of images of diving bells that evoke that same sort of weirdness, as best I could find

9 diving bells

Aircraft factories are gargantuan, complicated and interesting.The Boeing Everett factory, where the Jumbo Jet was built and the Dreamliner is being built is the largest volume building in the world. It has a floor plan of 100 acres, enough to fit more than a thousand family houses inside, with doors that are the size of football pitches.Included alongside Everett are a variety of factory shots of famous planes from Concorde to the Virgin Galactic space craft, the Blackbird and the B2.The shots of wartime assembly lines, which churned out aircraft at a rate associated with car assembly in environments that look like computer rendering from video games lines, include the famous secret factory at Burbank which was hidden under a fake hillside.

aircraft factories

Famous French industrial designer, Roger Tallon recently died, leaving something of a design mystery. Newspapers universally credited him as the designer of the iconic French high speed train, the TGV, but that was almost certainly the work of Jacques Cooper. Tallon did take over from Cooper to do the TGV Atlantique, but this was an evolutionary rather than a revolutionary design. Perhaps Tallon’s influence was more on the interiors? For me, Tallon’s best work was his 1960′s M400 spiral stair which seems to be the direct inspiration for some of Ross Lovegrove’s best work.

9 Roger Tallon Designs

Escape pods are a ubiquitous element of science fiction but surprisingly rare in real life. The ones I found are largely for high speed jet fighters or ships, submarines and oil platforms, but my absolute favorite is the patent drawing for a gigantic detachable commercial pod in a regular commercial airliner which floats passengers gently to the ground via an array of parachutes. In the massively unlikely event that this ever is realized, I will fly forever with any airline that adopts it.

12 real escape pods

Metal plate armor is one of the few technologies that emerged, disappeared in the 18th Century then re-emerged briefly during World War 1. Because of the this, WW1 armor has a particularly creepy, anachronistic look, from chain mail fringed splatter masks to body armor which looks decidedly Roman.

ww1 armor

The trend for dull or matt black motorcycles originated in ‘Rat Bikes’ as a reaction against stock vehicles with bright colors and overblown fairings. For the purist a rat bike is never washed and ridden till it falls apart, a purely practical and functional idea that ends up creating a particular look. Painting bikes matt black was originally part of this utilitarian idea but was appropriated by people who create ‘Survival bikes’. These have a deliberately designed post-apocalyptic look that traces back to things like the Max Max movie series. The line between rat bikes and survival bikes is sometimes blurred as people who consciously create the menacing, industrial look of survival bikes borrow from distressed and naturally aged rat bikes.What made this list particularly interesting from a design curation perspective was how a simple thing such as the type of paint has come full circle through various subcultures and into the mainstream.The 2007 Triumph Speed Triple, shown here, is a production motorcycle that is available in matt black, with a look and feel inspired by rat bikes. It completes the design cycle where a reaction of something mainstream becomes a mainstream fashion.

black rat bikes

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WTF is that? #9

June 4th, 2009 #link

wtf

Its pretty clear what this is – an aircraft entombed in ice – but what is the story, where is it and how did it get there?



3 Responses to “WTF is that? #9”

  1. Ruben De Keyser Says:

    The Glacier Girl, a Lightning P-38, was one of eight American aircraft forced to land on Greenland in July 1942 on their way to England. Recovered in 1992

  2. el_Pedro Says:

    I remember seeing some footage that the recovery crew cleaned one of the .50cals and successfully fired it – might not have been that specific aircraft though.

  3. admin Says:

    @Ruben. Absolutely right, its the Glacier Girl, a plane that was en route to the UK during WWII when it became part of a ‘lost squadron’, crash landing in Greenland. The crew survived but the plane remained there and was buried under nearly 300 feet of ice, when it was found, half a century later.

    It was restored and finally made it to its destination 60 years late.