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Flight simulation is quintessentially high tech, the inspiration for Virtual Reality, so I went looking for early examples and found some delightfully quixotic alternatives to modern day immersive environments. These include the wooden mockups of the Apollo capsules, the stunted Link simulator, used during WWII, which looks like a kids ride outside a supermarket and the very early pre-WWI training rig for the Antoinette aircraft, which principally consists of two half barrels on top of each other. But the best of all are the incredible Convair trainer which has an extra cockpit attached to its front and the celestial navigation trainers which are masterpieces of pre-electronic navigational complexity.

12 Retro Flight Simulators

The essential fashion item if you are going to the Beijing Olympics to watch people compete in air made of Jello – a gas mask. Gas masks are all more or less terrifying to look at, which is why some people get a kick out of them, creating artsy fetish masks, or artists create ironically cute masks such as Bill Barminsky’s Mickey Mouse mask.The irony is on the artists, however, since genuine Mickey Mouse inspired gas masks were given to children in both the UK and the US, during wartime, to appear less scary

unusual gas masks

Adding a sound system to something as skeletal as a bicycle is tricky task, but one that has been perfected around the world. From gangs in Queens to Critical Mass rallies boom box bikes are an interesting technological mix of eco and brash.

boombox bikes

Ray guns originated in the US in the 30s, from shows like Buck Rogers. What makes them a particularly interesting object is that despite, for all practical purposes, having never existed, there is an almost endless variety of designs for toy ray guns, from around the world.Here are some of the best we could find. Most are for sale, and are posted without description, since the images speak for themselves.

23 stunning ray guns

At first sight these buses may look horrifying, like miniature cattle wagons full of children. But they are a feature of a type of culture that is different from America where yellow school buses shuttle children often over large distances. This culture, common throughout the world is one that has grown organically, where distances are short enough to be cycled (where litigation is minimal!) and where homebrew transportation is common.In some ways these buses are a marvel of practicality and an interesting Oobject.

12 tiny Indian school buses

You can pick up an old Boeing jetliner for the price of scrap, and turn it into the ultimate trailer home. Here are some of our favorite examples of recycled planes used as houses and restaurants, including a former Irish airliner that ended up as a bar in Syria and a Jumbo Jet that is a restaurant in South Korea.

10 buildings in old planes

Around the same time Roy Lichtenstein copied comic books for the New York chattering classes, Papua New Guinean tribesmen did the same for their battle shields. These items are real, used in tribal warfare after prototypical lycra-clad American comic book hero The Phantom somehow struck a chord with traditional cultures in the Western Highlands. They are possibly one of the most bizarre items of popular culture’s infiltration of the far corners of the world.

15 Papua New Guinean superhero war shields

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Wtf is that? #20

May 28th, 2010 #link

wtf

A boat that goes in two directions. What could be the purpose of this crazy looking ship? The answer is suitably topical.



5 Responses to “Wtf is that? #20”

  1. Gaijiniji Says:

    Im guessing its for skimming oil from the surface of the sea?

  2. gaijiniji Says:

    Is it for skimming oil from the water surface?

  3. admin Says:

    Yes, that’s exactly what it is.

    What I don’t understand is how is propels itself forward without getting torn apart. I guess it doesn’t have a problem with fuel!

  4. Gaijiniji Says:

    Again this is only a guess but I would say that the mechanism for skimming and sucking in the surface water / oil would relieve a lot of the pressure (IE sucking it in and spewing out the excess water through some kind of vent)? I couldnt imagine it would be particularly fast in any case though! Getting it on location could be two seperate ships bolted together or assembled on site? Im not an engineer so no clue!

    Sorry for the double post!

  5. Jens W Says:

    the ship can be set to a closed position, where the two halfs touch each other. The propel mechanism is in the middle of both halfs.

  6. DanRR Says:

    This is an oil recovery vessel, it sweeps oil from the water surface.
    See this link for a similar ship:
    http://www.havariekommando.de/en/cis/inventory/Spill_response_vessel/Bottsand/index.html