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The tanning devices here may not be perceived as light therapy devices, but the concept of sun bathing morphed from scientific and quasi scientific light treatments at the end of the 19th century, where people would immerse themselves in light baths – hence the term sun bathing.Abuse of sun bathing as recreation has created a backlash, masking its genuine benefits in moderation and how it is perceived has obviously changed over time, as witnessed by my favorite item here which shows four congressmen in suits bathing in the light shower baths of the Turkish baths of the House of Representatives.

12 light therapy devices

Bang and Olufsen are famous for their superior design in electronics in the period prior to the 80s, yet there are no designers employed by the company. Instead, all design is traditionally outsourced and the Bang and Olufsen heyday, when their products were must have items for the homes of architects and designers is largely due to one man Jacob Jensen who designed a range of classic products between the late 60s and 80s.Like Apple today, Jensen obsessed with build quality and finish, and eschewed visible buttons wherever possible, using below glass illuminated controls and even proposing gesture based interfaces.Most satisfyingly, unlike current trends in design from double curved car shells to rounded corner boxes on web pages, Jensens trademark was ruthlessly squared off edges.

10 classic jacob jensen gadgets

Five of so architects have produced much of the most famous modern furniture. Here are 15 different chairs by 15 different famous modern architects. Vote for your faves.

15 architects 15 chairs

Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie used to be comedy partners. But Hugh Laurie has become more famous than Fry in the US by not shaving and doing a passable American accent in ‘House’.This week Fry fought back by combining celebrity and Apple worship. He created a web supernova by starting a WordPress blog and writing a 6500 word essay on smartphones. This has had Mac heads’ sphincters winking with excitement, because Stephen Fry actually knows what he’s talking about. He bought the second ever Mac in the UK, after Douglas Adams, giving him an Apple Erdos number of 1.(update: looks like Stephen Fry’s blog is currently ‘fried’. so we’ve posted a cache of his smartphone post under his entry in the chart.)Here is a list of geek-hero Apple users, vote for your all time favorite for our hall of fame:

20 geek hall of fame apple users

Manikins used for dental training are either deep into uncanny valley (creepy) territory if they try and look at all realistic, or just plain terrifying in their more abstract incarnations. A lot of this is just becuase (a) people are very good at interpreting faces and anything face-like seems possessed, (b) dental manikins have to bare their teeth so often have bizarre expressions. Anyhow, they are quite interesting, particularly the vintage metal ones which are a nastily grotty and beaten up.

12 dental training heads

Chandeliers are all about opulence and excess. When decoration became cheap to mass produce, in the early 20th century, minimalist modernism was in and things like chandeliers were out. The tide is turning, now that Ikea can stamp out designer modernism for the masses, designery magazines are starting to show decorative things now. Bu why buy a horrid crystal monstrosity for $10K when you can make a chandelier out of almost anything. Here is a selection of chandeliers made out of inexpensive things or found objects – including human bones.

17 found object chandeliers

I normally try and avoid military stuff unless there’s an ironic design twist, and there is here. Somehow, these crude, mechanical ‘remote control’ rifles, used for shooting over trenches manage to emasculate the phallic nature of guns and turn them into something worthy of Rube Goldberg himself. Nevertheless, they are for killing people sneakily, something to remember, while admiring their weirdness.

12 periscope rifles

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Wtf is that? #20

May 28th, 2010 #link

wtf

A boat that goes in two directions. What could be the purpose of this crazy looking ship? The answer is suitably topical.



5 Responses to “Wtf is that? #20”

  1. Gaijiniji Says:

    Im guessing its for skimming oil from the surface of the sea?

  2. gaijiniji Says:

    Is it for skimming oil from the water surface?

  3. admin Says:

    Yes, that’s exactly what it is.

    What I don’t understand is how is propels itself forward without getting torn apart. I guess it doesn’t have a problem with fuel!

  4. Gaijiniji Says:

    Again this is only a guess but I would say that the mechanism for skimming and sucking in the surface water / oil would relieve a lot of the pressure (IE sucking it in and spewing out the excess water through some kind of vent)? I couldnt imagine it would be particularly fast in any case though! Getting it on location could be two seperate ships bolted together or assembled on site? Im not an engineer so no clue!

    Sorry for the double post!

  5. Jens W Says:

    the ship can be set to a closed position, where the two halfs touch each other. The propel mechanism is in the middle of both halfs.

  6. DanRR Says:

    This is an oil recovery vessel, it sweeps oil from the water surface.
    See this link for a similar ship:
    http://www.havariekommando.de/en/cis/inventory/Spill_response_vessel/Bottsand/index.html