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The sight of a Zeppelin under construction must have been an awe inspiring experience. The hangers that were constructed for this purpose are the largest structures even created and the lightness required for the Zeppelin frames meant that their trusses consisted of sophisticated aluminum struts where each strut was in turn another truss. The overall effect is of incredible complexity and detail, like a gigantic high-tech whale set in a space that resembles a Piranesi engraving of a dungeon with enormous shafts of sunlight lit by dust. Because of their age, this technological look is combined with distinctly archaic elements, such as the gas bags which were made from thousands of cows’ stomachs or the scaffolding and ladders which are wooden and rickety.

Zeppelins under construction

Ted Stevens was right, the Victorian Internet consisted, quite literally, of a ‘Network of Tubes’. Paris, London, Prague and Vienna had extensive networks of pneumatic tubes which delivered messages in capsules. In New York 5 million mail messages passed every day through an underground pneumatic system, and a network in Berlin delivered hot meals directly to people’s homes suggesting that kitchens would no longer be needed in the future. Today these systems can still be purchased where they are used in places like hospitals where samples are passed between departments.

15 pneumatic message networks

I like these buildings, their high contrast sculptural forms give me a kick. But then again, I have a damaged view because I’m an architect, taught by the types of people who built these inner city sea-defenses. They were designed to last a 1000 years under the ravages of nature, but often haven’t lasted 50 under the impact of public opinion.Architects will tell you that the term Brutalism comes from the French term for raw concrete, ‘beton-brut’, but then again brut and brute share the same root and nobody but the completely stupid or naive would believe that the association will always be with the latter. This association is re-enforced by the use of brutalist buildings as the setting for a Clockwork Orange or the fact that Ian Flemming hated his Brutalist architect neighbor, Erno Goldfingerso much that he named a James Bond villain after him.Brutalism, for all its International credentials is really a British thing, and damp, concrete fortresses like the Park Hill Estate in Sheffield will never look like the Salk Institute, because Britain’s weather is not like California’s. But then again, if you like this thing then there are no better examples than Lasdun’s National Theatre or Neave Brown’s Alexandra Road.

18 brutalist buildings

The most impressive neon districts in the world include Tokyo’s Ginza and Shibuya, Osaka’s Dotonburi which was the inspiration for Blade Runner, the worlds largest shopping street, Nanjing Road in Shanghai and, of course, Vegas and Times Square. Bangkok’s Soi Cowboy district (named after an American who opened one of the first go go bars in the 70s) deserves inclusion on account of its unpleasant strangeness, with live elephants paraded up and down the pink neon streets.Most dramatic of all, however is Hong Kong where the entire skyscraper cluster is animated for 15 minutes as part of the worlds largest light show.Vegas and Times square deserve double mentions as they are more famous for iconic signage which has since been demolished or taken down. We have included footage of both past and present.Although the classic welcome to Vegas sign by Betty Willis has been preserved, many of the famous signs lie in the Vegas neon boneyard and we have included a movie made by urban spelunkers who broke into the yard to explore it.

The 10 most important examples of neon signage

Our favorite lights based purely upon aesthetics. Vote for your favorites.

13 best lighting designs

n honor of the Frankfurt Motor Show, record oil prices and the end of Burning Man – we’re doing a non car list as a green alternative.Here are the strangest bikes we could find, propelled sideways, backwards, in reverse or by climbing up a ladder. Vote on your faves.

16 crazy bicycles

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WTF is that? #19

March 10th, 2010 #link

wtf

It might not look like much, but recent evidence suggests that this might be one of the most historically important man-made artifacts in the world. What might it be?



2 Responses to “WTF is that? #19”

  1. m windsor Says:

    Supposed to be Ark of the Covenant

  2. admin Says:

    Unbelievable – you got it in one. It is the Ngoma Lungundu or ‘Drum That Is the Voice of God’ that is said by the Zimbabwean Lemba tribe to be part of the ark. The Lemba story that they are a lost tribe of Israelites was deemed fanciful until it was recently backed up by DNA evidence.

    The whole story of this object is like a real-life Indiana Jones movie plot.