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Bridge layers have to be about the closest thing in the real world to a Transformer, giant fold up, extendable instantly deployable bridges that are most often fixed to modified tanks. They have been around since tanks first existed, during WW1, and are one of the more bizarre and obscure forms of military hardware. There is also something incredibly circular about a vehicle that carries its own road.

12 mobile bridges

Quite often a company will release a limited edition item to mark a product’s anniversary that is actually worse than the original. We trawled the web to find examples of well designed anniversary gadgets, including our favorite, the 300lb limited edition espresso machine that was used by the Pope. Vote on your favorite.

14 anniversary edition products

If you want to build a Steampunk – Victorian – Dr. Frankenstein lab in your garage this weekend, here are some suggestions of where to ‘get that look’. Suggestions always welcome.

12 diy frankenstein lab items

The invention of the digital watch made accurate timekeeping a cheap commodity. This meant that expensive watches were a quixotic anachronism in terms of pure design. However, this very fact meant that designers were free to innovate timepiece designs for fun. In addition, the development of watch sized miniature electronic gadgetry meant that the wrist watch form factor could be used for other gadgets. For things like phones and MP3 players this has proved to be a failure, however included here are some interesting concepts for other uses for wrist devices such as insulin dosage, braille watches and health monitoring

16 concept watches

The history of computers is not all digital, from the humble slide rule to hydraulic models of the economy there is a rich history of both electronic and mechanical analog computers. Here are some of our favorite examples. These computers have certain advantages over their symbolic counterparts. They measure continuous variables in parallel and therefore their accuracy is limited only by the granularity with which their results are read and their speed is not limited by sequential operations.

Amazing Analog Computers

The telescopes chosen for this list are largely based on how they look, from a design perspective, rather than their scientific importance. Their unusual requirements create interesting structural engineering approaches. However, the Holmdel Horn Antenna is possibly the most interesting from both points of view, its highly unusual shape is like a gigantic ear trumpet sticking out of a garden shed, but it also happens to be the device which discovered the cosmic microwave background radiation – the echo of the big bang. I’ve included a view beneath the mesh of the gigantic Arecibo dish, just because I always wondered what that space was like. For the rest I’ve chosen ones which best display the spiky, high tech look of giant scaffolds and space frames or which are attached in impossibly top heavy ways ancillary buildings, like the giant upturned umbrella of the Parkes telescope.

18 radio telescopes

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WTF is that? #18

March 1st, 2010 #link

wtf

This object has some relevance, considering recent news. What is it?



5 Responses to “WTF is that? #18”

  1. nathan Says:

    its the internal dampener in the taipei 101
    http://www.geekologie.com/2008/06/the_730_ton_ball_that_keeps_th.php
    ~ i recognised this too fast

  2. Bryan Says:

    Guessing seismometer

  3. Mark Says:

    It’s a seismic dampening weight for a high-rise building.

  4. George Says:

    It is a seismograph.

  5. Gaijiniji Says:

    I believe this is a pendulum used in the top of a skyscraper to counteract the buildings sway from high winds and earthquakes. Im guessing the building is Taipei 101?

  6. admin Says:

    @mark @gaijiniji yes indeed its the massive earthquake damper in the Taipei 101, which weighs more than 700 tons.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuned_mass_damper