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Attempts by architects to create utopian communities usually have one distinguishing feature – they are not utopian and they fail. As such, they make great settings for dystopic fiction, such as the slightly kitsch and creepy Portmeirion in the Kafkaesque Prisoner TV series or Seaside, Florida in the Truman show.Some uptopias have been built and failed, such as Soleri’s semi-inhabited Arcosanti and some were only half realized, such as Disney’s Progress City, which ended up being watered down as Epcot. But possibly the most insane of all is Le Corbusier’s utopian vision for Paris which consisted of bulldozing the city of lights and replacing it with what resembles the worst projects in the South Bronx. It says a lot for the profession that the vision of arguably the world’s most famous architect was to destroy what is arguably the world’s most beautiful architecture.

9 utopian architectural projects

Despite being a qualified architect, IKEA furniture assembly quite often defeats me. Hence this list of self assembling objects, from computer memory to swallowable medical procedure components to chairs, particularly appeals. Perhaps Sweden should have a dedicated research institute geared around the discipline.

videos of self assembling machines

One of the benefits of the tradition of wooden buildings in the US is that they have fairly good tensile strength, so you can pick them up and move them elsewhere without them falling apart. This makes for some fairly surreal imagery, particularly in time lapse, since homes are all about static permanency. And we’ve included one daring masonry building move in the list, just to prove it can be done.

8 moving houses videos

The Zapruder film of the JFK assassination was shot on a Bell and Howell double 8 camera, at about the time of the introduction of Super 8, which created a ubiquitous format for affordable home movies. The difference in design between the Super 8 cameras and other 8mm cameras from as early as the 30s is clearly visible in this collection. The look changed from rounded shapes dictated by the film canister on early news reel devices, to a counter fashion for extremely orthogonal forms as exemplified here by the Star Trek like designs of the superb Bolex 150 from 1967.

20 classic 8mm movie cameras

Ross Lovegrove is renowned for beautiful fluid designs, earning him the nickname, Captain Organic. His $140,000 Muon speakers, for KEF were milled from enormous billets of solid aluminum, by an aeronautics manufacturer. A process that took a week.From his bladder molded, composite carbon and glass fiber DNA stair to liquid bioform furniture which is made using the same process used to manufacture body panels for Aston Martin cars, Lovegrove has teamed up with some of the world’s most innovative manufacturers to combine design excellence and futuristic materials.

futuristic ross lovegrove design

Jet engines undergo a variety of tests shown here, from chucking water, sand and flocks of dead birds into their gaping intakes. They are also tested to see what happens when a fan blade is destroyed while the turbine is spinning, with an explosive charge, not something to try at home. But the best tests of all are those involving jet engine afterburners and the best of the best has to be those with vector nozzles.These are real oobjects, objects that make you go ooh. Vote for your faves.

jet engine test videos

In the mid 50s an small Japanese electronics company, Tokyo Tsushin Kogyo, created an American sounding brand name, Sony, for a series of portable all-transistor radios. The product design was similarly American influenced, with wide spaced serif lettering, like that used on Amtrak trains or even Raymond Loewy’s original Air Force One, but with a flair and attention to detail that was distinctively Japanese. Half a century later, Sony, is still a consumer brand which is associated with superior design. Here are 12 of our all time favorite classic Sony Designs.

12 classic sony designs

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WTF is that? #15

October 7th, 2009 #link

wtf

What is it? What’s the story behind it?



5 Responses to “WTF is that? #15”

  1. Svipdag Says:

    It is used to check for fertility or diseases. Like drug sniffing dogs the bees will fly to a specific place within the bubble when they smell what they’re supposed to be looking for.

  2. Ryan Says:

    Its a bee bong.

  3. Jat Says:

    One way to get a buzz..

  4. Ryan Says:

    ha…

  5. admin Says:

    @Svipdag is right.

    One of the challenges picking things for the WTF section is that there are lots of very interesting looking objects produced by artists that wouldn’t be that interesting here.

    This item is different, it’s from Susana Soares at the RCA and combines an artistic interpretation with practical research into an idea of diagnosis devices that use the keen smell of bees.

    http://www.we-make-money-not-art.com/archives/2007/06/im-in-london-fo.php

    The results are beautiful.