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Magician’s posters are a particularly interesting form of advertising, since they are selling something which is, by definition, fake. This often leads to a particularly exaggerated and interesting graphic style, particularly with hypnotists. My favorites are the turn of the century ones which have early modernist or art deco graphics which predate their use in movie posters.

12 mesmerising magicians posters

After the furor over the potential Koran burnings last week, I had a look at the precedents, which it seems are everywhere, from Harry Potter to the Bible. For thousands of years, all religions and ideologies have been burning each others’ texts.

14 other examples of book burning

Watching robots get more and more sophisticated over half a century of commercials is fascinating. Trends evolve from the erector set inspired Mr Machine and terrifying Garloo to cute 70s robot buddies, through the Japanese dominated 80s and hip hop and rave culture inspired 90s.

toy robot commercials through history (videos)

Bridge layers have to be about the closest thing in the real world to a Transformer, giant fold up, extendable instantly deployable bridges that are most often fixed to modified tanks. They have been around since tanks first existed, during WW1, and are one of the more bizarre and obscure forms of military hardware. There is also something incredibly circular about a vehicle that carries its own road.

12 mobile bridges

The first early warning systems were large concrete dishes which focused the sound of incoming Zeppelins towards listeners wearing stethoscopes, during WW1. Today’s nuclear attack early warning systems are largely satellite based infra red detectors and airborne dishes, mounted on planes and helicopters. They have made a vast array of geodesic domed, Cold War radar installations obsolete, where they remain abandoned in some of the most isolated places on earth such as Greenland and Northern Canada.

early warning systems

Before rendering, 3d computer models are displayed as wireframes, which have a particular aesthetic. Several artists have tried to capture this in real life, with surreal models of things that aren’t really there. I also threw in Gaudi’s classic upside down catenary arch model of Sagrada Familia, for its sheer prowess.

9 real wireframe models

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WTF is that? #15

October 7th, 2009 #link

wtf

What is it? What’s the story behind it?



5 Responses to “WTF is that? #15”

  1. Svipdag Says:

    It is used to check for fertility or diseases. Like drug sniffing dogs the bees will fly to a specific place within the bubble when they smell what they’re supposed to be looking for.

  2. Ryan Says:

    Its a bee bong.

  3. Jat Says:

    One way to get a buzz..

  4. Ryan Says:

    ha…

  5. admin Says:

    @Svipdag is right.

    One of the challenges picking things for the WTF section is that there are lots of very interesting looking objects produced by artists that wouldn’t be that interesting here.

    This item is different, it’s from Susana Soares at the RCA and combines an artistic interpretation with practical research into an idea of diagnosis devices that use the keen smell of bees.

    http://www.we-make-money-not-art.com/archives/2007/06/im-in-london-fo.php

    The results are beautiful.