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The history of computers is not all digital, from the humble slide rule to hydraulic models of the economy there is a rich history of both electronic and mechanical analog computers. Here are some of our favorite examples. These computers have certain advantages over their symbolic counterparts. They measure continuous variables in parallel and therefore their accuracy is limited only by the granularity with which their results are read and their speed is not limited by sequential operations.

Amazing Analog Computers

The styles here represent the prosperity of the post war years when the cold war space race influenced the concept of modernity. GM and Ford created a range of space age aircraft design inspired prototypes .The Corvette Sting Ray, is perhaps the culmination of this period, with Corvette stylist, Bill Mitchell’s XP-87 forming the basis of the classic Sting Ray, one of the few cars in history to go into production without losing something of the impact of the prototype.

the golden age of american concept cars

Ever since James Bond had tricked out briefcases as an accoutrement for his array of gadgets, the idea of a suitcase full of a kit of gizmos for a specific task is seductive; or morbidly curious, in the case of apocryphal suitcase nukes. The concept predates James Bond, with transmitter suitcases which were make for allied spies during WWII.

tricked out gadget suitcases

The Zapruder film of the JFK assassination was shot on a Bell and Howell double 8 camera, at about the time of the introduction of Super 8, which created a ubiquitous format for affordable home movies. The difference in design between the Super 8 cameras and other 8mm cameras from as early as the 30s is clearly visible in this collection. The look changed from rounded shapes dictated by the film canister on early news reel devices, to a counter fashion for extremely orthogonal forms as exemplified here by the Star Trek like designs of the superb Bolex 150 from 1967.

20 classic 8mm movie cameras

Suits for hazardous materials are serious business and high tech., but look ridiculous. They come in several varieties: Splash Suit, Gas Suit, Turnout Coat for different levels of contamination. Their look ranges from giant pink translucent condom like outfits, to oversize Tasmanian Devil shaped suits. From the examples in this list, standard training procedures include washing down while standing in a regular inflatable kids paddling pool and basketball dribbling.

12 hazmat suits

From legendary conceptual architects Haus Rucker, who created mind expanding fly head like human cocoons and inflatables, in the 60s, to Lawrence Malstaff who does brilliant installations today, including a real typhoon in a cylindrical pod to humans shrink wrapped between to pieces of plastic, with a breathing tube. Here are a range of beautiful, filament like, cocoon structures produced by artists and architects.

15 human cocoons

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WTF is that? #14

August 28th, 2009 #link

wtf

What is it? What do you do with it?



11 Responses to “WTF is that? #14”

  1. me Says:

    meals on weals for miners…

  2. me Says:

    wheels

  3. admin Says:

    @me both surprisingly close and a million miles away.

  4. John Says:

    Ice Cream Cart for the Mines

  5. John Says:

    My real guess would be Explosives Transport

  6. olaf Says:

    Its a bathroom on wheels. Dump in the darkness of the coalmine. The lokomobile will take the poo after the shift back to the surface.

  7. admin Says:

    @olaf. Yes! It’s a miners toilet. I thought nobody would get this one, well done.

  8. admin Says:

    What I found so interesting about it is the total lack of ergonomics. Its as if to say, being in a mine is so uncomfortable anyway, making the toilet have a seat would be pointless.
    David

  9. Glen Says:

    Obama Care ambulance. It’s used to take the “Olds Folks and Infirm” down to the salt mines for transformation to one inch green squares.

  10. Nelg Says:

    They call it a honey wagon.

  11. Aaron Says:

    It’s for heating in cold mines. I think.