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These days most cutaways are computer rendered. Here are some physical cutaways that fascinate us as much as when travel stores had elaborate cutaway models of passenger jets.The most amazing is a model of Chernobyl reactor core 4, accurately depicting its ruined state after the disaster.

13 physical cutaway models

A perfect environmental nightmare, these hellish looking open faced mining machines have been largely decommissioned. Luckily some are being preserved as they are staggeringly impressive. The Ferropolis in Germany has many of these machines on display and forms an industrial park which host the famous MELT music festival. There have been several images of these floating around blogs, including the infamous pictures of the bucket wheel excavator that swallowed a full sized bulldozer, however we have tried to find as large a variety as possible.

16 giant bucket excavators

In the Avengers, Steed carried a sword cane. A sword cane was only one of a variety of gadget or system canes that were made popular in the Victorian era when everything from automatons, whiskey flasks, pipes, lighters, guns, umbrellas and golf clubs were combined in these antique gadgets.Here are some of the best ones we could find. Vote on your faves.

10 sword and gadget canes

Since Le Corbusier, celebrity architects realized that they needed to get a look, to be an icon. But being anal retentive this often resulted in the slightly reticent gesture of sculptural eyewear, like a miniature building hanging on your nose. Philip Johnson had Cartier make a copy of Corbusier’s glasses for himself in 1934, thus cementing the trend for architects in architect glasses.Here are a dozen famous architects and their specs, with a description below of what their glasses say about them.

12 architects with architects glasses

Nothing makes architecture quite as gadget like as if it folds up into a kit or a box. Here are 12 examples of rooms in a box by various designers. Many of these are actually purchasable, which is sometimes rare for conceptual architecture. Click through the links for their sources.

12 rooms in a box

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WTF is that? #12

July 16th, 2009 #link

wtf

What was in this case? It’s topical.



7 Responses to “WTF is that? #12”

  1. DanRR Says:

    It’s an ALSRC, Apollo Lunar Sample Return Container also referred as “rock box”.
    http://www.nasm.si.edu/events/apollo11/objects/apolloartifact.cfm?id=A19710814000

  2. Gaijiniji Says:

    Is it a case for holding radioactive material?

  3. admin Says:

    @Dan. Yes it is!

    And suitably impressive it is too. Often items designed to transport precious objects are disappointing wooden crates, but this box is absolutely perfect.

    If it had been made by a Hollywood prop designer I would have thought that it was too overblown. But its the real thing, and with its Swiss bank vault like protection it is a thing of beauty.

    Happy 40th birthday rock box that rocks!

  4. Ryan Says:

    This would be perfect for my collection of ch.. I mean porn. Just normal porn.

  5. BRUCE CREE Says:

    it’s one piece of my gf’s luggage (a container inside of a container)

  6. Mighty Mike Says:

    Right the first time. It’s the case used to bring back lunar rocks to Earth. Then again, I’m in the biz, so have a slight edge.

  7. Shawn Says:

    As a custom case designer by trade, I’m impressed. Altho I could do without the banding across the top, but if it makes them feel better, so be it. Pelican take notice!