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For some reason cities around the world are scrambling to build massive Ferris Wheels in the name of modernity. Which is odd because this is old fashioned technology and not much improved. The biggest wheel in the world is less than twice the size of the very first one in Chicago. Ultimately however, what is disappointing about the biggest Ferris wheels in the world, from Beijing to Berlin is that they are boring. Here are our favorite less ordinary Ferris Wheels.

10 unboring ferris wheels

Football kit (American football), has changed dramatically over a relatively short history, such that early football helmets look positively medieval and the latest anti-concussion helmets are fully fledged gadgets in their own right.The first football helmet designs were soft shell lattices that resemble those still worn by rugby players. Unlike rugby, however, contact can be made when you don’t have possession of the ball, so helmets became progressively more robust and elaborate. Around the 1920s helmets were clearly inspired by Roman army ones, only made of soft leather and occasionally with full face-masks. These ‘executioner’ helmets are the most sought after collectors items, today.The first metal face masks appeared in the 30s although they did not become commonplace until the 50s, when the modern helmet took shape, eventually becoming a hard plastic or composite shell.

12 football helmet designs

From commercial kits such as the Chaos Toy or Spacewarp, to the world’s largest ball run, the 70 foot high Energy Machine in the Hong Kong Science Museum, these complicated contraptions are a classic form of Rube Goldberg Machine.Here are a collection of videos of some of the worlds most impressive ball runs in action, including the Mark Bischoff machine that was recreated for Anthony Hopkins’ obsessive character in the movie Fracture, to one built for a one-off ending to Sesame Street.

15 videos of amazing rolling ball machines

In the pre Pirate Bay days of analog transmission, pirate radio stations were setup in the most bizarre places, to avoid being shut down. Many of these were offshore, in boats, lighthouses, disused forts, or even balloons or planes.The idea for outlaw stations came from the US military who broadcast from B 29 bombers, over Vietnam, ships off the coast of Soviet states and continue to broadcast to Cuba from balloons. Israel is the last remaining country to have pirate radio ships in operation, where they broadcast ultra conservative religious programming.

Weird Outlaw Radio Transmitters

What passes for interactive clothing often consists of a button to control your iPod from your sleeve.Here is a roundup of some more interesting interactive clothing ideas, including a jacket whose fur stands on end like a scared cat, a bikini whose breast pads inflate as a life saver and a jacket with a digital organism that grows as you wear it. These are alongside some more serious ideas such as a medical monitoring clothing and a robotic jacket to aid the paralyzed. Some are fairly well known, but others are hopefully new to you.

22 best interactive clothes

A gallery of products using radioactive materials.Because radiation was seen to be new and powerful, at the beginning of the 20th century radioactive material was used in products such as face creams, mineral water and medicine, by equating power with rejuvenation. For similar reasons it was even used in items from spark plugs to condoms. Although many of these items are from an age when the dangers of radiation were not known, radiation is obviously useful as a healing tool for cancer therapy, but it is still used in legal Chinese remedies, which are respected more because of their age rather than efficacy and quack homeopathic medicines which are tolerated while unproven, because they are harmless water.Vote on your fave examples.

14 radioactive products

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WTF is that? #12

July 16th, 2009 #link

wtf

What was in this case? It’s topical.



7 Responses to “WTF is that? #12”

  1. DanRR Says:

    It’s an ALSRC, Apollo Lunar Sample Return Container also referred as “rock box”.
    http://www.nasm.si.edu/events/apollo11/objects/apolloartifact.cfm?id=A19710814000

  2. Gaijiniji Says:

    Is it a case for holding radioactive material?

  3. admin Says:

    @Dan. Yes it is!

    And suitably impressive it is too. Often items designed to transport precious objects are disappointing wooden crates, but this box is absolutely perfect.

    If it had been made by a Hollywood prop designer I would have thought that it was too overblown. But its the real thing, and with its Swiss bank vault like protection it is a thing of beauty.

    Happy 40th birthday rock box that rocks!

  4. Ryan Says:

    This would be perfect for my collection of ch.. I mean porn. Just normal porn.

  5. BRUCE CREE Says:

    it’s one piece of my gf’s luggage (a container inside of a container)

  6. Mighty Mike Says:

    Right the first time. It’s the case used to bring back lunar rocks to Earth. Then again, I’m in the biz, so have a slight edge.

  7. Shawn Says:

    As a custom case designer by trade, I’m impressed. Altho I could do without the banding across the top, but if it makes them feel better, so be it. Pelican take notice!