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What passes for interactive clothing often consists of a button to control your iPod from your sleeve.Here is a roundup of some more interesting interactive clothing ideas, including a jacket whose fur stands on end like a scared cat, a bikini whose breast pads inflate as a life saver and a jacket with a digital organism that grows as you wear it. These are alongside some more serious ideas such as a medical monitoring clothing and a robotic jacket to aid the paralyzed. Some are fairly well known, but others are hopefully new to you.

22 best interactive clothes

A gallery of products using radioactive materials.Because radiation was seen to be new and powerful, at the beginning of the 20th century radioactive material was used in products such as face creams, mineral water and medicine, by equating power with rejuvenation. For similar reasons it was even used in items from spark plugs to condoms. Although many of these items are from an age when the dangers of radiation were not known, radiation is obviously useful as a healing tool for cancer therapy, but it is still used in legal Chinese remedies, which are respected more because of their age rather than efficacy and quack homeopathic medicines which are tolerated while unproven, because they are harmless water.Vote on your fave examples.

14 radioactive products

Named after the famous cartoonist, Rube Goldberg machines are unlike ordinary gadgets in that they are deliberately inefficient, taking the maximum number of steps to achieve a goal. Last years winner of the Rube Goldberg competition took over three hundred steps to squeeze a glass of orange juice.To truly appreciate RG machines you need to see them in action. Here is a list of videos of our favorites. Vote for yours.

12 best Rube Goldberg Machine videos

Complex dangerous machinery isn’t the first choice for a home-brew project, unless you are rural farmer, apparently. Some of these look like remnants of a cargo cult, and most of them received stern warnings from the relevant civil aviation authorities to not even try firing them up, but a couple actually flew.

homemade helicopters

Ted Stevens was right, the Victorian Internet consisted, quite literally, of a ‘Network of Tubes’. Paris, London, Prague and Vienna had extensive networks of pneumatic tubes which delivered messages in capsules. In New York 5 million mail messages passed every day through an underground pneumatic system, and a network in Berlin delivered hot meals directly to people’s homes suggesting that kitchens would no longer be needed in the future. Today these systems can still be purchased where they are used in places like hospitals where samples are passed between departments.

15 pneumatic message networks

Flea circuses share one thing in common with combine harvesters. They are something that you hear about lot as a kid but rarely see. Popular since the 1600s till the late 19th Century, there is something fantastically creepy and Victorian about them, since they were cheap entertainment for the poor and the best performers were human fleas. Despite the mythology, flea circuses are real, and some still exist. Here are some pictures and videos to prove it.

10 flea circus contraptions

Teasmades possibly represent the nadir of industrial design, combining Rube Goldberg, or more appropriately, Heath Robinsonesque unnecessary mechanic complexity with technological denialist styling and often capped off with horrid little lampshades.Appropriately enough, these diabolical devices were pioneered by a brand called Goblin, and were rendered obsolete after unfashionable UK Prime Minister, John Major’s wife Norma confessed to having one in Downing St. Sadly, someone is making them again.

9 diabolical teamaking contraptions

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WTF is that? #10

June 22nd, 2009 #link

wtf

What is it, and what’s the story?



7 Responses to “WTF is that? #10”

  1. tutash Says:

    Cargo Cult. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cargo_cult

  2. Seth McQuale Says:

    It’s a Cargo Cult totem. GIS for “cargo cult” and that picture is in the listings.

  3. Ken Says:

    It is a tribal representation of a plane. The tribe thinks of it as a god and is trying to copy it….

  4. Jan Says:

    Cargo Cult totem.
    Tribal is trying to lure in some planes carrying food.

    During WWII primitive tribes in asia noticed that US troops coming in planes always had to eat, but did not do agriculture at all.

  5. admin Says:

    Yup its a Cargo Cult plane – People from primitive societies sometimes believed that the sophisticated manufactured goods (cargo) from visiting cultures must have been magical gifts from the gods. So they built replicas. More here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cargo_cult

  6. Jim Barzydlo Says:

    Wiki entries notwithstanding… Several years ago there was a documentary about the stone monoliths on Easter Island. I believe the natives saw the plane of the documentary crew and constructed this effigy of it. It looks awfully familiar, I’m pretty sure that is where this particular picture comes from.

  7. art glock Says:

    GM’s new prototype