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Dueling pistols are strange, beautiful and ironic. Gadgets to shoot each other in the face with, crafted with the delicacy and decorative extravagance of expensive jewelry.They appeared in the 18th C, as faster firing versions of flintlock guns replaced swords. Their use dwindled in the 19th C, while duels were still fought in the Western US states where the less rich would engage in gouging, similarly prearranged combat, with the aim of plucking out the opponent’s eyes.Dueling pistols were designed for the upper classes, for the preservation of honor, used illegally by generals and poets (Pushkin was killed in a duel), several US presidents (even Lincoln accepted a challenge to a duel)and even presented, with no sense of irony, as diplomatic gifts.

12 pairs of dueling pistols

You too can ruin your kids childhood, by making their happy smiley toys sound like Stephen Hawking or a bad Radiohead cover. Fitter Happier Stronger.Circuit bent Furbys are currently all the rage, however, all manner of kids toys have been circuit bent and modified, from classic Texas speak and spell machines, to a device called feces farm. Vote for your faves.

top circuit bent kids toys (videos)

Clocks and watches with the traditional latin reminder of mortality. Wonderfully morbid.

memento mori timepieces

The Highline is fashionable in every sense. A park inspired by one in Paris, a combination of Euro chic, treehugging sanctity and hipster industrial grunge.But it sits above ground, shovels people off the streets via stairs which cyclists can’t use and leads from nowhere to nowhere. In addition, little money ha been spend on the dark spaces underneath, which could easily negate any benefit provided above.The designers involved are great and there are nice touches, but could it have been better just to have torn it down and created something at street level. Such talk is heresy, but here are 9 reasons why we are disbelievers.

9 reasons why the highline sucks

Balloons formed the origins of what became the USAF, have been used for stratospheric parachute jumps, bungee jumps and even to test nuclear bombs. Vote for your faves.

12 interesting balloons

For sheer baroque complexity of appearance, planetarium projectors are among the most amazing gizmos ever built. They range from enormous machines more than 20 ft. high to a soccer ball sized $300 home version.Their purpose is a bizarre reversal of a large optical telescope, taking an internal view of the the universe and projecting it on a dome, rather than creating a view from peering outside of one, but the aesthetic is somewhat similar. Another curious similarity is how much they look like some early satellites.Our personal favorites are the original Zeiss, Mark I and the truly amazing machine built by the Korkosz brothers for the, appropriately named, Seymour Planetarium.

16 incredible planetarium projectors

To consider how lucky the Phoenix lander is, consider that a dozen Mars missions have failed on launch and a dozen (shown here) have failed after. Some say that Mars missions are cursed, by the reasons tend to be more mundane, such as the infamous Mars Climate orbiter failure which was due to a mistake using imperial rather than metric measures in software.

12 Mars Mission Failures

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WTF is that? #10

June 22nd, 2009 #link

wtf

What is it, and what’s the story?



7 Responses to “WTF is that? #10”

  1. tutash Says:

    Cargo Cult. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cargo_cult

  2. Seth McQuale Says:

    It’s a Cargo Cult totem. GIS for “cargo cult” and that picture is in the listings.

  3. Ken Says:

    It is a tribal representation of a plane. The tribe thinks of it as a god and is trying to copy it….

  4. Jan Says:

    Cargo Cult totem.
    Tribal is trying to lure in some planes carrying food.

    During WWII primitive tribes in asia noticed that US troops coming in planes always had to eat, but did not do agriculture at all.

  5. admin Says:

    Yup its a Cargo Cult plane – People from primitive societies sometimes believed that the sophisticated manufactured goods (cargo) from visiting cultures must have been magical gifts from the gods. So they built replicas. More here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cargo_cult

  6. Jim Barzydlo Says:

    Wiki entries notwithstanding… Several years ago there was a documentary about the stone monoliths on Easter Island. I believe the natives saw the plane of the documentary crew and constructed this effigy of it. It looks awfully familiar, I’m pretty sure that is where this particular picture comes from.

  7. art glock Says:

    GM’s new prototype