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Our favorites here are the food based instruments of The First Viennese Vegetable Orchestra and the spectacular Atlantic City Convention Hall Organ which is practically the 8th wonder of the world.

15 strange musical instruments

Long before periscopes became uniquely associated with submarines, they were widely used to peer over the trenches in WW1. Here are other uses from on board jet aircraft to golf courses, bank vaults and even to look underwater from dry land – the inverse of what we associate periscopes with.

9 non submarine periscopes

For high speed chase scenes or a low speed horse back rides, the film industry’s cameras occasionally have to go mobile and when they do, they rely on specialist high tech. cars and trucks.Usually wearing intimidating matte black paint (to reduce glare) these vehicles are often engineering wonders, employing after market performance upgrades, elaborate electronics, exotic materials and even gyro-stabilizers to keep a subject in frame. With companies like Pursuit Systems, AP Cam Cars and a handful of others fulfilling Hollywood’s high speed needs, the vehicles they create are rarely seen but hard to overlook.Here are some of out favorites including the amazing Go system, used for The Bourne Supremacy.Curated by Chris Hull

12 movie industry camera cars

From commercial kits such as the Chaos Toy or Spacewarp, to the world’s largest ball run, the 70 foot high Energy Machine in the Hong Kong Science Museum, these complicated contraptions are a classic form of Rube Goldberg Machine.Here are a collection of videos of some of the worlds most impressive ball runs in action, including the Mark Bischoff machine that was recreated for Anthony Hopkins’ obsessive character in the movie Fracture, to one built for a one-off ending to Sesame Street.

15 videos of amazing rolling ball machines

Phoropters, the gadgets used by opthalmologists to test your eyes look like the most spectacular binoculars you have ever seen.The traditional complex mechanical versions are technological works of art made by lens makers such as Bausch and Lomb and have the design quality of a classic vintage Leica camera. Only now are these marvelous gadgets slowly being replaced by simpler looking, wireless, digital versions which relay data to a computer for image analysis.

15 spectacular eye testing gadgets

From double amputee, Aimee Mullins, who modeled for Alexander McQueen on a pair of beautiful hand-carved wooden prosthetic legs made from solid ash to amputee soldiers who would not have survived without advances in combat medical care and who are returning to active combat at a rate which is 7 times higher than a generation ago (2% – 16%) to athletes such as Oscar Pistorius, whose carbon fiber prosthetics help him compete at a level which calls into question the separation of ‘special’ athletic competition, the way we view prosthetics and disability is changing. 3d printing, advanced composite materials are enabling this from an aesthetic and design standpoint as much as the more obvious technical advances through electronics and bio feedback systems.

Aesthetic Prosthetics

Bridge layers have to be about the closest thing in the real world to a Transformer, giant fold up, extendable instantly deployable bridges that are most often fixed to modified tanks. They have been around since tanks first existed, during WW1, and are one of the more bizarre and obscure forms of military hardware. There is also something incredibly circular about a vehicle that carries its own road.

12 mobile bridges

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Apple is closed source. What do you think of the iPhone 3GS?

June 9th, 2009 #link

The announcement of the iPhone guaranteed one thing – that every Apple keynote after it would be a disappointment.

Yesterday, was no exception. Apple announced a go-faster version of the iPhone, with a moniker reminiscent of a 1970s Citroen car, the 3GS and a minor software upgrade.

The new hardware featured a camera that was almost as good as standard issue for other phones in Europe and Japan.

The new software added a few do-dads, such as a remote bleeper and software erase that only works if you sign up to the Apple software service that gives you things like an inferior version of Gmail.

New apps were showcased, such as the very promising looking Tom Tom application and unpromising looking Tom Tom kit that hinted it would cost almost as much as a standalone GPS device, thus defeating the point.

But the big deal was the addition of tethering, allowing you to use the iPone as a 3G modem. Something that many 3G phones already do.

No matter that 3G tethering presumably costs money via the providers Apple listed, the problem was that it wouldn't work at all in the US, via the sole carrier, ATT.

Although Apple could be playing passive aggressive, deliberately directing flack at ATT, this is not just an ATT problem.

Apple is no longer the little guy offering a better alternative to Microsoft. Increasingly Apple's closed platform is becoming an irritating hassle, rather than a price that is worth paying for well designed and integrated products from hardware to software.

Here are some of the unnecessary irritations and bad design that Apple's closed approach creates:

1. You cannot easily store your music on an external device without needless messing around with iTunes restrictions.

2. You cannot go abroad with your iPhone and slip a new SIM card in without a huge pain in the ass.

3. You cannot take advantage of many new iPhone or OS features without subscribing to a service that offers inferior versions of free online services like Gmail, that will always be better because of the resources allocated to them.

4. You cannot replace the battery in an iPod, iPhone or (now) MacBook without a screwdriver.

Apple products are beautifully designed where most gadgets are useless toys, and the OS is peerless but there is a creeping sensation of needless and irritating lock in.



4 Responses to “Apple is closed source. What do you think of the iPhone 3GS?”

  1. Nick Taylor Says:

    Something I’ve been noticing recently is people using iPhones as brains for other devices – there’s been a motorbike recently that used one as a dashboard, a UAV that used one as eyes/autopilot etc… I can see something like an iPhone being a de-facto plugin brain for quite complex machines – like a really really smart Arduino with inbuilt senses.

    But it ain’t going to be an iPhone because iPhones are closed-source.

  2. apotheosis Says:

    I guess Apple learned nothing from their experience. Closing ranks around their platform and product line very nearly destroyed their company once already.

  3. OB Says:

    Yeah, because Microsoft is soooo open sourced thats why they are soooo successful… By what factual logic have you linked the near demise of Apple to its closed OS…?
    Oh, let me answer that for you. None.