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This year saw the appearance of New Years style countdown clocks for the iPhone, Vista, Halo 3, the end of the world and the end of Bushs presidency next year. Strangely, with the man behind 24s famous countdown clock doing 48 days jail time, its amazing that nobody has whipped up a 48 countdown in the style of 24. Yet. Vote for your faves.

10 2007 countdown clocks

Chandeliers are all about opulence and excess. When decoration became cheap to mass produce, in the early 20th century, minimalist modernism was in and things like chandeliers were out. The tide is turning, now that Ikea can stamp out designer modernism for the masses, designery magazines are starting to show decorative things now. Bu why buy a horrid crystal monstrosity for $10K when you can make a chandelier out of almost anything. Here is a selection of chandeliers made out of inexpensive things or found objects – including human bones.

17 found object chandeliers

Pleasure piers are a unique and interesting piece of architecture in that they are both whimsical and sinister. Inhabited bridges that lead nowhere and aren’t meant for ships to dock, they are often abandoned, creepy and decrepit, yet covered in brightly colored gadgets built for amusement. These piers are giant technological follies.One of the few remaining giant Victorian English pleasure piers burned down today. In fact a large proportion of them burned to the ground, which you might think is ironic, since they are surrounded by water. The sea breeze which was the reason they were built in the first place, as health promenades, is what makes them a fire hazard as winds fan the flames of timber buildings.

12 pleasure piers

What are the essential gadgets to carry around every day? The first in a series where various people describe their current or ideal stash. Today its Oobject’s turn. Vote to rank our choices.

Oobjects perfect gadget bag

There are plenty of interesting unbuilt projects for some of the world’s most famous cities, but there is something particularly unsettling about alternatives for things that were build. Some monuments are so iconic that their alternatives seem like sacrilege.Included here among various alternatives for Tower Bridge, the Washington Monument, The Chrysler building and St. Paul’s Cathedral are proposed extensions to the White House, a 5 million tomb alternative to London’s famous Victorian cemeteries and a particularly uninspiring second place entry for the Sydney Opera House competition. My personal favorite, however is the Triumphal Elephant which could have capped off the Champs Elysees in Paris. If someone could only find the rejected competition entry for what became the Eiffel Tower, which consisted of a giant replica of a Guillotine.

12 alternative versions of famous monuments

Bel Geddes is the industrial designer most associated with the streamline style, an aerodynamic form than was as much about aesthetics as wind resistance. These designs actually look better than more aerodynamic forms and as such were used by Geddes for things that didn’t have to move at all, such as his streamlined school desk. Geddes started out as a theatrical designer then made a series of model cars and prototypes for trains and planes, including the incredible airliner number 4 – a 1929 proposal for a transatlantic boat plane carrying 450 passengers and an army of staff including a musicians and entertainers. But the other thing that Geddes created was his daughter, who was Miss Ellie in the TV series, Dallas.

12 Norman Bel Geddes creations

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Apple is closed source. What do you think of the iPhone 3GS?

June 9th, 2009 #link

The announcement of the iPhone guaranteed one thing – that every Apple keynote after it would be a disappointment.

Yesterday, was no exception. Apple announced a go-faster version of the iPhone, with a moniker reminiscent of a 1970s Citroen car, the 3GS and a minor software upgrade.

The new hardware featured a camera that was almost as good as standard issue for other phones in Europe and Japan.

The new software added a few do-dads, such as a remote bleeper and software erase that only works if you sign up to the Apple software service that gives you things like an inferior version of Gmail.

New apps were showcased, such as the very promising looking Tom Tom application and unpromising looking Tom Tom kit that hinted it would cost almost as much as a standalone GPS device, thus defeating the point.

But the big deal was the addition of tethering, allowing you to use the iPone as a 3G modem. Something that many 3G phones already do.

No matter that 3G tethering presumably costs money via the providers Apple listed, the problem was that it wouldn't work at all in the US, via the sole carrier, ATT.

Although Apple could be playing passive aggressive, deliberately directing flack at ATT, this is not just an ATT problem.

Apple is no longer the little guy offering a better alternative to Microsoft. Increasingly Apple's closed platform is becoming an irritating hassle, rather than a price that is worth paying for well designed and integrated products from hardware to software.

Here are some of the unnecessary irritations and bad design that Apple's closed approach creates:

1. You cannot easily store your music on an external device without needless messing around with iTunes restrictions.

2. You cannot go abroad with your iPhone and slip a new SIM card in without a huge pain in the ass.

3. You cannot take advantage of many new iPhone or OS features without subscribing to a service that offers inferior versions of free online services like Gmail, that will always be better because of the resources allocated to them.

4. You cannot replace the battery in an iPod, iPhone or (now) MacBook without a screwdriver.

Apple products are beautifully designed where most gadgets are useless toys, and the OS is peerless but there is a creeping sensation of needless and irritating lock in.



4 Responses to “Apple is closed source. What do you think of the iPhone 3GS?”

  1. Nick Taylor Says:

    Something I’ve been noticing recently is people using iPhones as brains for other devices – there’s been a motorbike recently that used one as a dashboard, a UAV that used one as eyes/autopilot etc… I can see something like an iPhone being a de-facto plugin brain for quite complex machines – like a really really smart Arduino with inbuilt senses.

    But it ain’t going to be an iPhone because iPhones are closed-source.

  2. apotheosis Says:

    I guess Apple learned nothing from their experience. Closing ranks around their platform and product line very nearly destroyed their company once already.

  3. OB Says:

    Yeah, because Microsoft is soooo open sourced thats why they are soooo successful… By what factual logic have you linked the near demise of Apple to its closed OS…?
    Oh, let me answer that for you. None.